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Auto recycling: The Circular Economy 

Posted by on Sep 12, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Auto recycling: The Circular Economy 

Understanding reduction, re-use, recycling and valorization can be a huge benefit. As of June 2017, the Association of Auto Part Recyclers in Quebec (ARPAC) has embodied the 3RV (Reduction at source, Reuse, Recycling and Valorization) Contribution as a small charge on bills for used car parts that are issued by members in the province—10 percent of a total invoice to a maximum of $5. As the automotive industry is always evolving, this contribution is designed to support investments to help lower the environmental impact of end-of-life vehicles. The name of the endeavour, 3RV Contribution, was inspired by the circular economy, which considers everyone involved in the creation and life of a product to figure out the best way to reduce energy and the use of raw materials. Understanding the circular economy model is seen as the best way to partner together from an environmental standpoint, because it considers the whole life of an asset, such as a car, from production to end-of-life. ARPAC and ARC ARPAC has been geared toward environmental protection for the last 45 years.A member of the Automotive Recyclers of Canada (ARC), ARPAC also contributed to the Canadian Auto Recyclers’ Environmental Code (CAREC), which ensures all members of ARC are audited every three years to meet the national organization’s environmental standards. In addition to the ARC audit, the 34 ARPAC.comm/piecesvertes.com members have an additional third-party audit every two years. ARC supports the 3RV Contribution initiative, as auto recyclers are one of the few industries that can back up the cost of being ahead of environmental regulations. Where AARPAC is concerned, discussions began more than 10 years ago on the obligation to maintain the highest standards in environmental protection. This was just before the start of the mercury switch recovery program, which gave birth to the “Switch Out” program across Canada. There has also been a contribution to a best-practices guide for end-of-life vehicle management, first released by Quebec in 1998. Economic and Environmental Investment ARPAC has been investing in environmental protection for the last 45 years, and has seen first hand how the Quebec Environment Quality Act has evolved during this same time. Our goal is to exceed the minimum standards set by the government to ensure that their members are the best in the industry at end-of-life vehicle recycling, and to promote the fact that buying a green part makes good sense ecologically and economically. Environmental protection is something for which we should all be responsible and accountable. If there’s room within an industry or within your area of an industry to stay ahead of the curve, it should definitely be a priority for your business or association. Collision Management Magazine, September 2017 The post Auto recycling: The Circular Economy  appeared first on Automotive Recyclers of Canada. Source: Industry...

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Auto Recyclers Spreading Awareness

Posted by on Aug 9, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Auto Recyclers Spreading Awareness

Auto Recyclers Spreading Awareness

Community involvement is a key strategy for many automotive recyclers. Community involvement is a way to put a human face behind auto recycling, because we remain a misunderstood industry. What better way to relate to people than with something that’s important to the local area your business serves? When a business is a proud community partner, the impact is larger—and so are the numbers on the fundraising side of things because it’s easier to capture media attention. Tire Take Back has generated more than $1 million over the last seven years to support the Sunshine Foundation of Canada, which makes dreams come true for children living with severe disabilities or illnesses. Many of the dreams fulfilled by Sunshine involve visiting Walt Disney World, so Logel’s Auto Parts issued a press release in a province-wide effort to send kids to Disney by bringing in their scrapped tires. In doing so, they were able to garner media attention to both the cause and their business. “Community involvement is important to us at Logel’s because we’ve been in business at the same location for almost 60 years,” says John Logel Jr., the Owner of Logel’s Auto Parts. “We have deep roots in Kitchener, and we believe it’s important to give back to the community that has helped us have a successful business for three generations. Plus, it gives us a chance to get our name out there and hopefully educate the public about what we do.” Community awareness campaigns Auto recyclers’ community involvement doesn’t stop at fundraising. Most of the members have some sort of interaction with their local first responders and supply cars for extraction and vehicle fire training. Many also have partnerships with organizations like MADD, and will donate a wrecked car to be placed in front of the local school around prom night with signage on the dangers of drinking and driving. Thorold Auto Parts in Niagara has done a lot of work on texting and driving awareness, too. Thorold placed a wrecked car out front with a sign indicating this is what can happen when you text and drive. This project has now morphed into a full marketing program. It’s just a great opportunity to talk to the media about what auto recyclers are about. Taking it to social media Our role as the association is to support those members who understand that you need to have a community profile and fresh content. If one recycler is doing something anywhere in Canada with a community angle, we’re pushing it out to our members via social channels like Facebook and Twitter. More of the members understand this, and they’re looking to the association for a flow of fresh content. We always say we want you to be the go-to auto recycler in your community. We don’t want people to like OARA’s   Facebook page, we want them to like your Facebook page, so reuse our content to keep things fresh. That’s a part of what we’re trying to do from a strategic perspective. We want to show everyone that this is easy stuff—if you’re not already doing it, then do it, and if you’re already doing it, then capture it and tell people about it. Collision Management July 2017 The post Auto Recyclers Spreading Awareness appeared first on Automotive Recyclers of Canada. Source: Industry...

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Recycling in the north: what goes up must come down

Posted by on Jun 23, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Recycling in the north: what goes up must come down

Recycling in the north: what goes up must come down

The Automotive Recyclers of Canada (ARC) have long advocated for a national recycling standard, but the logistics of getting waste or parts from Northern Canada back down to where they have value are complicated. There is a real gap between what we’re doing in the populated south and what they’re even capable of doing up there. Tundra Take Back, run by Scout Environmental, is a program that partners auto recyclers with northern communities to efficiently manage end-of-life vehicles and minimize their environmental impact. Scout is a not-for-profit organization that develops and implements sustainability programs. ARC has worked with them on a number of different projects, including Retire Your Ride, Switch Out and Car Heaven. Tundra Take Back began in Nunavut about three years ago in a few different communities. ARC acts as a catalyst for making people understand that auto recycling can be done right, but sometimes you need to improvise. What better place than the far north to figure that out? Three years in During the first year, we figured out what we didn’t know. The second year, we worked in three or four locations and kept fine-tuning the model until last year, when we were in about five locations. We visited one location where we didn’t actually do any hands on work, but it was all about training. They brought in a few local people and walked through our environmental protocols that form the bases for how and where you depollute a vehicle, and then began to brainstorm how they could manage without the equipment or buildings that most of us have easy access to down here. Ultimately, we provide a little bit of money and a lot of knowledge in terms of the codes and how-tos, but we also provide our members expertise and the opportunity for them to travel up north. These members are excited to work within their area of expertise in a completely different environment and experience a new culture. A life of its own The program has begun to identify some longer term funding, so rather than going year-to-year, they’re starting to tap into federal, provincial and territorial monies to provide for better planning. Tundra Take Back has truly taken on a life of its own and ARC is there to promote it and to bring the members in as an organization that is dedicated to ensuring vehicles are depolluted and recycled responsibly across Canada. The north is a part of Canada, and we have some responsibility to make sure that it’s done right up there too.   It’s a very interesting project for us as an organization in that it lets us demonstrate that we’re proactive, part of the solution and allows us to provide expertise and information in a place that not many people get to go visit. Collision Management June 2017 The post Recycling in the north: what goes up must come down appeared first on Automotive Recyclers of Canada. Source: Industry...

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The Fate of Your Vehicle

Posted by on Jun 9, 2017 in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The Fate of Your Vehicle

The Fate of Your Vehicle

Note: originally published in 2011 in CAA Magazine – we have made some progress in Ontario. How to ensure your old clunker doesn’t become an environmental hazard. It’s probably not something you’ve ever thought about, but where you take your vehicle when it reaches the end of the road can make the difference between an environmental disaster and a model of environmental responsibility. The truth is, not everybody handles end-of-life vehicles (ELV) and vehicles that have been in accidents the way they should. Steve Fletcher, Executive Director of the Ontario Automotive Recyclers Association (OARA), has heard some of the horror stories. With many automotive recyclers, trying to extract the most value from an ELV by cutting environmental corners is unfortunately a growing practise. “Our members, however, follow a very strict code of practice in the way they handle a vehicle. they spend a lot of money to build and maintain facilities that are specially designed to capture and store potentially harmful operating fluids and other toxins such as mercury and lead. We keep all of that stuff contained and prevent it from contaminating the soil and groundwater. The technicians who do the work are trained to follow a methodical process that maximizes the amount of material that can be reclaimed and minimizes the environmental impact,” says Fletcher. The problem, Fletcher explains, is that not everybody follows the same protocol or plays by the same rules. “We know of some scrap operations who buy cars just to crush them and sell them for the value of the metal. They don’t drain anything and they don’t do anything to protect the environment. And when metal prices are high like they are now, those guys really come out of the woodwork.” Fletcher says their members remove an average of 40 litres of potentially hazardous fluids from each vehicle, as well as lead, mercury and ozone-depleting gases. “All the oil, gas and other operating fluids pose a significant risk to the environment if they’re allowed to just leach into the soil. Our members carefully drain all the fluids and store them for reuse or recycling.” Fletcher adds that gas tanks, batteries and tires are all removed and recycled, reused or disposed of appropriately. The vehicle is then sent for dismantling where usable parts are removed for resale. “By the time our members crush a car, it is a clean, dry hulk that poses no threat to the environment. Only then is the unusable portion of the vehicle crushed and sent to be shredded for metal recovery,” says Fletcher. Incredibly, there is currently no legislation that dictates how an ELV has to be handled, although the OARA is working with the provincial government to set environmental standards for the processing of ELVs. The OARA is also working with environmental groups and a number of leading auto manufacturers who have recognized the need to ensure ELVs are properly processed at the end of their operating lives. “When people are done with their vehicles, they really need to be aware of who they’re selling it to. It can make all the difference in the world,” says Fletcher. The post The Fate of Your Vehicle appeared first on Automotive Recyclers of Canada. Source: Industry...

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